Exercise May Reduce the Complications of Diabetes

This press release is an announcement submitted by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and was not written by Diabetes Health.

Activity may delay diabetes onset in those with glucose intolerance

Jan 4, 2010

ROSEMONT, IL - Exercise is a critical piece of a healthy lifestyle, however those who suffer from diabetes may see an even greater impact, according to a study published in the January/February 2010 issue of Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Authors confirm that exercise can aid in diabetes treatment by improving glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

When a healthy individual eats a meal, the pancreas produces insulin. This insulin helps the body store and use the glucose, or sugar, present in the food for energy and everyday activities. A body affected by diabetes either does not create enough insulin or does not properly use the insulin produced. When insulin release and glucose levels are not balanced, either high or low blood sugar can result.

This is where exercise can help. "During exercise, insulin is suppressed to allow more glucose to be released from the liver, but, it also makes the muscle cells more sensitive to insulin, allowing for a more efficient use of the glucose, " explains Karl B. Fields, MD, an author of the study and a physician at the Family Practice Center at Moses Cone Hospital.

There are two types of individuals affected by diabetes: Type 1 individuals are typically thin and are affected by diabetes at a young age. In these individuals diabetes is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Type 2 individuals are more commonly overweight adults, though the disease has become more prevalent in younger age groups due to obesity. Type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. The study notes that each group can benefit from exercise, however, it is important for a diabetic athlete to consult with a physician before beginning an exercise program to assess any needed adjustments to insulin intake.

"Diabetic athletes should meet with their physician regularly to assess glycemic control. Their physician will establish a baseline hemoglobin A1c. Type 1 diabetics with a baseline level higher than nine percent should not participate in vigorous exercise until the baseline control is improved. Type 2 who have a poorly controlled baseline levels should begin an exercise program with low intensity, increasing intensity as control levels are improved," advises Fields. In individuals without diabetes, the baseline level is typically less than six percent.

The study provides some other recommendations for athletes with diabetes. These include:

  • Aerobic exercise five days a week (a minimum of 150 minutes a week)
  • Resistance training three days a week
  • Consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal before exercise (insulin-dependent diabetic)
  • Blood glucose monitoring before, during, and after exercise

Diabetic individuals can also improve their health by smoking cessation, blood pressure control, and lipid management. "It is very important that an individual suffering from diabetes take progressive steps in creating a healthy lifestyle; changes to diet and physical routine can make a significant impact in diabetes treatment. But, in order for the changes to be beneficial, they have to be long-term," Fields adds.

***

Source:

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Press release

Click Here To View Or Post Comments

Categories: A1c Test, Blood Glucose, Blood Sugar, Diabetes, Diabetes, Exercise, Fitness, Food, Insulin, Type 1 Issues, Type 2 Issues


Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • What's on the Horizon with Diabetes Research and Therapy
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter

Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Print | Email | Share | Comments (1)

You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 8 January 2010

The recommendation for insulin dependent diabetics of "a carbohydrate rich meal" prior to exercising is very poor advice for the following reasons: A. eating an entire meal before exercise will often result in discomfort or cramps; B. when the insulin dependent diabetic eats a meal, the carbohydrates must be balanced with insulin. This means exercising with high levels of carbohydrate AND insulin in your system - a recipe for dramatic highs or lows, depending upon the situation.
More appropriate would be a small snack, only if it is indicated by testing immediately prior to exercise. This is standard practice for diabetic atheletes, and I'm not sure why the Sports Medicine society is in the dark.


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.