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Islet & Pancreas Transplant Archives
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Pancreas Transplant Program Opens at Montefiore Medical Center

Jan 16, 2010

This press release is an announcement submitted by PRNewswire, and was not written by Diabetes Health.

NEW YORK, Jan. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Montefiore Medical Center continues to expand its portfolio of options for patients in need of organ transplantation. The new Pancreas Transplant Program will treat patients with severe, end-stage diabetes. As the only Pancreas Transplant Program in the Bronx and Westchester, and one of only several in Greater New York, patients will be able to receive world-class care close to home. The program currently has nine patients medically approved and waiting for a pancreas transplant.

"The Bronx represents a well-documented high risk community with a higher than average incidence of diabetes and diabetes secondary complications, so there is a critical need here for a first-rate pancreas transplant program," said the program's director, Javier Chapochnick Friedmann, M.D., a transplant specialist.

Montefiore Medical Center has a proud tradition of offering kidney and liver organ transplantation with excellent results. "The recruitment of Dr. Chapochnick Friedmann from Chicago adds to the tremendous abdominal organ transplant team led by Dr. Milan Kinkhabwala," said Robert Michler, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief and Chairman of the Department of Surgery.

The pancreas program, along with existing, well-established kidney and liver transplant programs, is located on Montefiore's Moses campus in a newly renovated suite of clinical offices that now houses the entire Abdominal Transplant Division.

"A pancreas transplant is reserved for those patients with diabetes who cannot be controlled by standard treatment," said Dr. Chapochnick Friedmann. "When a transplant is necessary, however, the results are excellent."

There are approximately 1 million patients with diabetes in New York State and an additional 450,000 who do not know they have diabetes. There are 1,400 pancreas transplants performed each year in the United States.

Most patients who receive a pancreas transplant also receive a kidney transplant. The vast majority of these dual transplant procedures (approximately 75-80 percent) are done simultaneously in one operation. A lesser, but growing number of patients first receive a kidney transplant and then later, in a separate operation, a pancreas transplant.

The pancreas is located behind the stomach and makes insulin, a hormone that is necessary to control blood sugar levels in the body. When the pancreas does not function well and produces too little insulin, blood sugar levels can rise to dangerous levels and this can lead to diabetes. For many patients with diabetes, insulin shots are the answer. For a select few, however, who develop severe diabetes with complications (such as heart problems), a new pancreas/kidney transplant may be life saving.

Montefiore Medical Center encompasses 126 years of outstanding patient care, innovative medical "firsts," pioneering clinical research, dedicated community service and ground-breaking social activism. A full-service, integrated delivery system caring for patients in the New York metropolitan region and beyond, Montefiore is a 1,491-bed medical center that includes: four hospitals -- the Henry and Lucy Moses Division, the Jack D. Weiler Division, the North Division and The Children's Hospital at Montefiore; a large home healthcare agency; the largest school health program in the US; a 23-site medical group practice integrated throughout the Bronx and Westchester; and, a care management organization providing services to 179,000 health plan members.

In 2008, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore was ranked as one of "America's Best Children's Hospitals" in US News & World Report's prestigious annual listing and also received honors in the magazine's 2009 edition. The Leapfrog Group lists Montefiore among the top one percent of all U.S. hospitals based on its strategic investments in sophisticated and integrated healthcare technology.

Montefiore is committed to meeting the healthcare needs of the future through medical education and manages one of the largest residency programs in the country. Montefiore is The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Albert Einstein College of Medicine and has an affiliation with New York Medical College for residency programs at the North Division.

Distinguished centers of excellence at Montefiore include cardiology and cardiac surgery, cancer care, tissue and organ transplantation, children's health, women's health, surgery and the surgical subspecialties. Montefiore is a national leader in the research and treatment of diabetes, headaches, obesity, cough and sleep disorders, geriatrics and geriatric psychiatry, neurology and neurosurgery, adolescent and family medicine, HIV/AIDS and social and environmental medicine, among many other specialties. For more information, please visit MACROBUTTON HtmlResAnchor www.montefiore.org or www.montekids.org. 

* * *

Source: 

Montefiore Medical Center
http://www.montefiore.org/ 
http://www.montekids.org/ 

PRNewswire press release

 

 


Categories: Blood Sugar, Diabetes, Diabetes, Insulin, Islet & Pancreas Transplant, Type 1 Issues



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Comments

Posted by Diabetes Awareness on 17 January 2010

Clearly, more money needs to be invested into research as Type 2 diabetes figures are set to double in the USA. Pancreas transplantation has good success rates but there are long waiting lists.

Funding is also needs to include awareness campaigns to increase the number of donations.

Posted by Anonymous on 9 February 2010

In a perfect world, all Type 1 diabetics could consider a pancreas transplant BEFORE they are at a critical point. How much damage has to be done to the body due to out-of-control blood sugars before a major treatment such as this can be made? When would have been the right time to consider my friend for a transplant? She is in her early 40's and struggled for 8 years before having both legs amputated within a 2 year period. Being low-income, a pump was never an option, but I think it might have made enough of a difference so that she might have kept her legs. Might a transplant BEFORE major complications make more sense? Unfortunately, that just becomes a wish for more people with a healthy pancreas to die so that more diabetics may live longer. It's not a fair trade. Let's hope the research into the protein responsible for islet transplant rejection is successful.


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