"America's Silent Killer" on The Oprah Winfrey Show

This press release is an announcement submitted by Oprah.com, and was not written by Diabetes Health.

Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and More Join Forces to Combat

Feb 4, 2010

CHICAGO, IL - On Thursday, February 4, Oprah, Dr. Oz, Bob Greene, Art Smith, Dr. Ian Smith and more reveal the staggering human cost of the growing diabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic on a special episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show. Before a studio audience comprised of all diabetics and their families, Oprah and Dr. Oz reveal the latest facts and figures, share stories of those affected, and hold a no-holds-barred, revealing conversation about risk factors, diet and lifestyle.

According to the American Diabetes Association, 80 million people in the U.S. have diabetes or are on the verge of getting the disease-and about 6 million of them don't even know it yet. In the African-American community, the problem is even more stark: according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), half of all African-American women born after the year 2000 will develop diabetes in their lifetime.

Says Winfrey, "Diabetes is a ticking time bomb. It's a silent killer. It's annihilating the African American community. Literally. It's killing almost 100 of us every single day in the African-American community."

According to the CDC, the U.S. spends $174 billion every year on combating diabetes, making it one of the most expensive health issues in the nation. Dr. Oz says, "If we don't fix the problem of diabetes in this country, we will bankrupt our future ability to pay for health care in the nation. Period."

Winfrey and Dr. Oz are also joined by fitness guru Bob Greene, who will reveal the hidden sugars lurking in everyday meals and snacks, and diet expert Dr. Ian Smith. Plus, a diagnosis of diabetes became an urgent wake-up call for celebrity chef Art Smith. Now, after losing 85 pounds and reversing his diabetes, he offers viewers his tips.

As part of the show, Oprah will also announce a special offer that will help every American get their blood sugar tested for free. For more information on receiving a free blood glucose test and to find your nearest 24-hour Walgreens location, please visit  Walgreens.com/diabetes

All Walgreens 24-hour stores and Take Care Clinics will be offering free blood glucose testing Friday, February 5, 2010, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.  No appointment is necessary.

If you don't live near a 24-hour Walgreens location or can't get tested on February 5, 2010, you can still receive a free glucose test before February 18, 2010 . Visit  Walgreens.com/diabetes  for specific testing hours at a Walgreens store or Take Care Clinic near you where they will be accepting walk-ins during the next two weeks. Or, call 1-800-WALGREENS  to make an appointment. This offer is valid through February 18, 2010.

Source:

Press release from Oprah.com

http://www.oprah.com/pressroom/Oprah-Dr-Oz-Bob-Greene-Art-Smith-and-More-Focus-on-Diabetes

http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/Free-Blood-Glucose-Screening-at-Walgreens

 

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Categories: Blood Glucose, Blood Sugar, Community, Diabetes, Diabetes, Type 2 Issues, Weight Loss, Women's Issues


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Comments

Posted by Jdubwordman on 4 February 2010

Once again the public focus is more on T-2. We could and should cure this disease but no-one ever does shows on the progress of research for curing the disease. I wonder if that has anything to do with the companies that pay for advertising on television. A cure would hurt a lot of pharm companies in a big way and what tv station is going to air a program that makes their sponsers that angry?
Jeff

Posted by Anonymous on 6 February 2010

Jeff has an excellent point. Someone told me that there are cures for diabetes, cancer and others. The problem is the pharm. companies. After all, if diabetes and other illnesses are cured, the pharm. companies will be out thousands, even millions. I pay plenty for my supplies. I stretch them out as far as I can. As I type this comment, I am actually starving myself so I don't have to take insulin. Pretty sad, isn't it?

Posted by Anonymous on 6 February 2010

I am so angry with what they did on Oprah! Scaring people into submission NEVER WORKS! It didn't impress me as a newly diagnosed type 1 33 years ago and it still doesn't work now! (look at results! Do you really think more people follow the guidlelines because they are scared of the outcome?) I had two diabetic patients call me in TEARS scared to death that this was their fate; that starting shot of the double amputee in the hosptal bed was appalling! My patients thought this would be a "feel good" positive show about how taking good care of diabetes would help them live healthy lives and instead got the tar scared out of them and couldn't sleep! Did anyone care to differentiate between type 2 and type 1 or THOSE who do NOT take care of their conditions as opposed to those who work hard at it? Did they show any examples of healthy type 1's who have had it for 30+ years and have lived incredible lives or was this all about scaring people to death? Their feedback to me was that they liked my approach of presenting the BENEFITS of taking care of themselves because that offered hope and made them want to fight harder to achieve it...I've always avoided depressing negative scare tactics like that and am proud to say that I am living well as a type 1 for 33 years!

Posted by Anonymous on 7 February 2010

I agree with the 33-year Type 1's comments in more ways than one, though I can *see* myself in every one of the comments written here. First, there was indeed yet more and more focus on Type 2; this not only tucks Type 1 away, it leaves people at a loss as to "why such a thin, young woman could have diabetes" -- this from other already-diagnosed individuals! Yes, there was a mention on the Oprah show that this would be focused on T2, but WHY is that? Why is it ALWAYS about T2? This only creates and encourages ignorance. Also, the scare tactics in this program were hard for me to take, and I'm a 15-year T1 veteran who knows the risks as well as the benefits -- the benefits of taking care of myself the best that I can versus the risks of NOT taking care of myself. Did seeing those images at the start of the program suddenly motivate everyone living with T2 who has been facing denial and indifference for a long while to suddenly do an about face? Those images disturbed me; I can only imagine what sort of detrimental effect they'd have on someone who isn't ready to accept his or her condition. It's like saying that someone isn't going to commit a murder because he might risk being executed; in the moment, you're not thinking about an execution that might or might not happen -- you're operating in the "now." Maybe an extreme comparison, but a fairly realistic one, I think.

I did something as a T1 that I had promised myself I'd do for 20 years prior to actually doing it -- I traveled to Liverpool and spent a week there, in the midst of Beatle Week. I saw sites that I never imgained I'd be stood close to. And I did this while living with this condition. I walked EVERYwhere in Liverpool. I had one night when I faced a bad low after a long concert and the realization that I had no glucose tablets remaining (I found an adequate substitute the next day in a pharmacy). But I didn't let my diabetes stand in the way of doing something I wanted to do since long before diabetes stepped into my world. We CAN live happy, full, active, complete lives. We don't all suffer the consequences of poor control.

I'm facing a terrifying reality right now. For the first time since diagnosis, I have no insurance (no COBRA offered; no money to pay for it if it WAS offered -- I just lost my second job in 1.5 years), very little money, and I've been one week on and one week off my pump for the last year because the insurance itself was so highly restrictive, with an enormous single-person deductible (so I couldn't afford what I'd need anyway). It's wreaked havoc on my control in terms of my facing even MORE lows than I do while pumping -- and serious, severe lows; I was out during an overnight the other night until 5 p.m. Saturday afternoon. But I have Lantus, I have Novolog, I can buy a vial of NPH and Regular and I have plenty of syringes. I've cut down to extreme lows with testing -- sometimes only 2 or 3 times per day, which is not good for someone living alone with hypo unawareness -- because I can't afford strips out of pocket, and I can't even afford to pay my monthly financial obligations. I need to find a job with adequate insurance as soon as possible, or I fear becoming a statistic.

Still, I've managed to get through the last 15 years reasonably unscathed and in fairly good health. Scare tactics like those used on this program don't work; and for those of us already living with diabetes, they just frustrate.

Posted by Anonymous on 7 February 2010

I was disappointed that they really didn't differentiate between type 1 diabetes and type 2, especially when they said diabetes could be cured or reversed. I also agree with the train of thought that why would cure this, the pharma compaines & drug mfg are making $$$ hand over fist.

Posted by Rick on 7 February 2010

si didn't watch the show as i've had type 1 for 44 years and didn't think i'd learn anything i didn't already know. from what i've read so far it sounds as if the insurance companies had some input. they want to scare the hell out of everyone, not that there can't be catastrophic complications, but if people take care and avoid these horrible results it would save them billions of dollars which would result in higher profits. if they didn't balance out these horrible stories with ones of people dealing successfully with diabetes and living healthy and productive lives than shame on oprah winfrey. she did a huge disservice to everyone. i, for the time being anyway, have a good healthcare plan. my heart hurts for those that have to sacrifice so much to buy supplies. "starving oneself to save on insulin." this should not be happening in a country as rich as ours. it's shameful!! if they stopped the war in iraq at 8 billion every month that could pay for everybodys healthcare. we take care of everyone else but our own. i pray for everybody that are having a hard time. God bless you. hopefully things will get better.

Posted by seashore on 7 February 2010

What causes type-2 diabetes? Diabetes is a disease of elevated blood glucose (aka “blood sugar”). Blood sugar is produced primarily by carbohydrates (carbs) in the diet. Type-2 diabetes is the result of consuming too many carbs over a prolonged period. The primary approach for avoiding or treating type-2 diabetes is to eat a low-carb diet. A low-carb diet is also an essential requirement for effective treatment of type-1 diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) insists that diabetics should eat a Low-FAT diet. This results in a High-CARB diet, which makes the diabetes worse. Ideally, a diabetic should consume no more than 30 grams of carbohydrate a day; whereas the ADA recommends that diabetics should consume at least six times this amount of carbohydrate.

The ADA reasons that, since diabetics have a very high incidence of heart disease, they should eat a diet that minimizes their risk of heart disease. Basically, this reasoning is sound. However, the ADA slavishly follows the obsolete and fallacious concept that a low-fat diet reduces the risk of heart disease. Following this fallacious dogma, the ADA insists that diabetics should eat a low-fat diet, which results in a high-carb diet. The high-carb diet makes the diabetes worse, and so greatly increases the incidence of heart disease.

Probably the main cause of the increase of diabetes and obesity in our society in recent years is the mistaken belief that a low-fat diet is healthy. This low-fat mania has greatly increased carb consumption. This has greatly increased obesity, type-2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Posted by seashore on 7 February 2010

As a type-2 diabetic, I would like to add a postscript to my earlier comment, which is directed particularly to the type-1 diabetic.

Dr. Richard Bernstein, in his book, Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution”, shows that type-1 diabetics (as well as type-2 diabetics) can avoid diabetic complications by eating a low-carb diet. He recommends that carbs be ideally limited to 30 grams per day. Dr. Bernstein has had type-1 diabetes for more than a half century.

Posted by freeinformation on 7 February 2010

Thanks for sharing this very important information on fighting diabetes through correct nutrition.

George
http://www.acai.vg

Posted by ivory on 7 February 2010

We can all admit that Diabetes has reached and past epidemic propotions all over the world. The complications we know can be deadly. If we will be honest with ourselves, we can see the point that The Oprah Winfrey show made about diabetes. Many people with diabetes (type1 or type 11) been sucessful with self mamangement, void of any of the complications, and best of all, you are living a healthy and uncomplicated life with diabetes I commend you, and I wish you much more success Providing this timely information to as many people that you can to get the results that you are enjoying is the point. It's said that someone is diagnosis with diab. every so.....many minutes. People who have diab. and not know it is multiplying as we speak-read. Everyone can help by sharing information regarding diab like Ophrah, it may not be on that level, but,the point is to get the information out there. The more the light is shed on this devastating disease, the better educated, and prepared we will be. I believe people all over the world, and especially the U.S. can benefit from what was Shared on this show. Let's band together. and get the information out there. Only when "we the people", take the initiative, get the knowledge, and understanding, will we rid our nation of diabetes. This disease can be deminished by changes in our life styles and diets. We must take that responsibility and the quality of our lives out of the hands of the drug companies.

Posted by ivory on 7 February 2010

We can all admit that Diabetes has reached and past epidemic propotions all over the world. The complications we know can be deadly. If we will be honest with ourselves, we can see the point that The Oprah Winfrey show made about diabetes. Many people with diabetes (type1 or type 11) been sucessful with self mamangement, void of any of the complications, and best of all, you are living a healthy and uncomplicated life with diabetes I commend you, and I wish you much more success Providing this timely information to as many people that you can to get the results that you are enjoying is the point. It's said that someone is diagnosis with diab. every so.....many minutes. People who have diab. and not know it is multiplying as we speak-read. Everyone can help by sharing information regarding diab like Ophrah, it may not be on that level, but,the point is to get the information out there. The more the light is shed on this devastating disease, the better educated, and prepared we will be. I believe people all over the world, and especially the U.S. can benefit from what was Shared on this show. Let's band together. and get the information out there. Only when "we the people", take the initiative, get the knowledge, and understanding, will we rid our nation of diabetes. This disease can be deminished by changes in our life styles and diets. We must take that responsibility and the quality of our lives out of the hands of the drug companies.

Posted by Rick on 8 February 2010

type 2 diabetes is usually brought on by obesity and lack of physical activity. but when i was diagnosed in 1966 with type 1 i was 5'10" and weighed 170lbs. i was active, played sports, etc. type 1 is contracted not from lifestyle choices. i'm now 62 years old and i would love to lose 25lbs. but i don't see how anyone can survive on just 30 grams of carb daily. one apple can have 30 grams of carb. i was told by my endo to try and limit carb intake to 60 per meal, that's 90 per day and that hard to do. so if seashore would explain how to get by with 30 grams of carb per day i would appreciate it.

Posted by Rick on 8 February 2010

thinking about what seashore says that type 1 diabetics should limit themselves to 30 carbs per day is a ridiculous statement. anyone who is taking insulin and follows this advice could easily find themselves in the emergency room with insulin shock. maybe she's promoting the adkins diet which will get you heart disease faster that carbohydrates.

Posted by seashore on 8 February 2010

To Rick: How do you survive on 30 grams of carbs per day? Read Dr. Bernstein’s book.

The basic answer is that you should eat more FAT and PROTEIN and less carbs. If you follow the low-fat dogma proposed by most nutritionists, you cannot survive on a diet that contains 30 grams of carbs per day.

As a starter, one should eat eggs (including the yolks) for breakfast. Eggs are very healthy. There is no evidence that the cholesterol or fat in egg yolks causes heart disease. Do not eat cereal, muffins, etc., which are almost entirely carbs.

When you begin your low-carb (30 gram/day) diet, REDUCE your insulin. Measure your blood sugar often enough to assure that you avoid hypoglycemia. As Dr. Bernstein explains, it is very much easier to keep blood sugar within safe limits when a low-carb diet is followed. The claim that a low-carb diet results in hypo insulin shock is nonsense.

Posted by Rick on 8 February 2010

a vegan diet would make more sense than what you propose. a diet high in fat and protein would do irreprable harm to your kidneys not to mention your cardiovascular system.

Posted by seashore on 8 February 2010

Dear Rick: You have hit the nail right on the head. You believe that, “A diet high in fat and protein would do irreparable harm to your kidneys not to mention your cardiovascular system.”

This principle underlies the philosophy of the American Diabetes Association and most of the medical treatment of diabetes today.

There is overwhelming evidence that this principle is dead wrong. It is time for this principle to be openly debated. Until this issue is clarified, it will be impossible to halt and reverse our tragic diabetes epidemic.

Posted by Rick on 9 February 2010

to seashore, these facts are urgently needed by millions of people coping with this disease around the world. i, for one, am very interested in this and plan on looking for dr. burnsteins book.


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