Looking at Cannabis Based Type 2 Treatment

Cannabis Potential for Blood Sugar Control?

| Jun 30, 2011

One of the classic effects of cannabis on people is raging hunger-the "marijuana munchies." The drug has been used to good effect on people with diseases that diminish appetite, helping them to regain a healthy interest in food. So it is a bit ironic that British drug maker GW Pharmaceuticals has created a cross-bred cannabis plant whose appetite-suppressing qualities could be used to treat type 2 diabetes.

The new strain contains an appetite-suppressing compound called THCV (tetrahydrocannabivarin), a cannabinoid* found in cannabis sativa-marijuana. The company sees a drug that uses THCV as potentially useful in helping type 2s and obese people control their appetites-a key to good blood sugar control.

In 2010, GW introduced a cannabis-based drug to treat the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Already, the company has found 60 cannabinoids in the cannabis sativa plant. A company spokesman says that only 12 to 15 of them have been explored in any depth.

*Cannabinoids are the active ingredients in cannabis sativa that create the plant's physical and mental effects when it is ingested or smoked.

 

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Categories: Blood Sugar, Cannabis/Medical Marijuana, Diabetes, Diabetes, Food, Health, Obese, Type 2 Issues, Type 2 Medications


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Comments

Posted by Anonymous on 30 June 2011



The new strain contains an appetite-suppressing compound called THCV (tetrahydrocannabivarin), a cannabinoid* found in cannabis sativa-marijuana. The company sees a drug that uses THCV as potentially useful in helping type 2s and obese people control their appetites-a key to good blood sugar control. If the government would only allow research there's no telling how many ,medicines could be made. Let's not forget that study that cannabis shrunk a brain tumor. unbelievable that cannabis is classified and no medical use.

Posted by rosiolady on 5 July 2011

After 40+ years of type 1 diabetes, I am currently using ingested cannibis (in the form of tea)for treatment of chronic pain due to fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. I can no longer use NSAIDS for pain relief because my kidneys are compromised, and opiates don't provide as much relief and they also make me dizzy and fuzzy headed. The way I use the ingested cannibis it does not do that. Also, even though I've always fought with obesity (not so common in type 1s...) I find that the cannibis does not give me the munchies or food cravings in a greater degree than I have them anyway. I keep cravings at bay with a low carb diet. I live in Oregon where medical marijuana is legal and am lucky enough to have a reliable provider--not everyone has. It would be so much better for people with complicated medical problems, in my opinion, if medical marijuana could be legalized on a federal level and the study of it opened to researchers in the health care field. I believe it is a wonderful untapped resource for us.


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