Need We Fear Exercise-induced Cardiac Arrest?

Need We Fear Exercise-induced Cardiac Arrest?

| Sep 7, 2012

The media abounds with stories about the sudden collapse and death of athletes whom we assumed were in the best of health.  When such cases occur, we may become concerned about exercising ourselves.  A recent presentation describing people who had been exercising during or within one hour of a cardiac arrest may assuage these concerns to a degree.

The research, presented at the European Society of Cardiology by Dr. Arend Mosterd of the Netherlands, involved a three-year look at out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in people who had been exercising during or within one hour of their arrest. Almost half of the patients survived. “Persons suffering an exercise-related OHCA are three times more likely to survive the event than persons whose arrest is not exercise-related,” said Dr Mosterd. He added, however, that the good survival rate may have due to the fact that these individuals became ill in a public location where the situation was immediately noted and bystanders quickly began cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), often with fast access to an automated external defibrillator. 

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Categories: Cardio Exercise, Diabetes, Diabetes Health, Diabetic, Research


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Comments

Posted by bonnynemia on 11 September 2012

Need I fear exercise-induced cardiac arrest? Yes, I always do. Not for a moment since I started using daily physical activities as my only anti-diabetes med in July 1991 have I forgotten my own interpretation of the statement said by our family physician then, Dr. Adelto Adan, a cardiologist at Mid-Michigan Medical Center in Midland. After passing the required stress test, I was told: "Go try killing yourself with exercise."

"Did he say that sarcastically?" I asked myself.The previous day when we found out that the basis of my diagnosis as a type 2 diabetic was a sky-high fasting blood sugar reading of 468 mg/dl, he ordered me to take several anti-diabetes pills. I refused to do so. If he was sincere, then his statement meant that I would not be able to kill myself with exercise.

To play it safe, every time that I ran the stairs in our house for a daily total of 2 hours/day (I did this for 16 1/2 years), I always made sure that I had no pain, no discomfort, no unusual heavy breathing, no tiredness, or no unexpected and unexplainable abnormal feeling.

I don't do stair-running anymore to avoid having knee problems. For about 5 years now, I have been doing a combination of jogging in place, power walking, and modified push-ups. So far so good. My past A1c's were from 5.2% to 6.3%, the one done on August 29, 2012, was 5.6%. I have never had any hypo episode and have never had any diabetes complication despite my heavy intake of carb foods.

My exercise routines now are much easier but I still do 2 hours total/day.

Bonny Damocles
Male, 76 years old, 5'7", 141 lbs.


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