Take the Diabetes Health Pump Survey
See What's Inside
Read this FREE issue now
For healthcare professionals only
  • 12 Tips for Traveling With Diabetes
See the entire table of contents here!

You can view the current or previous issues of Diabetes Health online, in their entirety, anytime you want.
Click Here To View

See if you qualify for our free healthcare professional magazines. Click here to start your application for Pre-Diabetes Health, Diabetes Health Pharmacist and Diabetes Health Professional.

Learn More About the Professional Subscription

Free Diabetes Health e-Newsletter
Latest
Popular
Top Rated
Metformin Archives
Print | Email | Share | Comments (0)

Maryland Researchers Enrolling Type 2 Patients in Long-Term Drug Study


Aug 18, 2013

This press release is an announcement submitted by , and was not written by Diabetes Health.

BALTIMORE-Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine are enrolling patients with type 2 diabetes into an NIH-funded clinical trial to evaluate the long-term benefits and risks of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication.

The University of Maryland Medical Center and the Baltimore VA Medical Center, which are affiliated with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, constitute one of the 37 sites across the United States participating in this trial, called the Glycemia Reduction Approaches in Diabetes: A Comparative Effectiveness (GRADE) Study. The study is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Investigators aim to enroll approximately 5,000 people who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the last five years. University of Maryland researchers expect to enroll 150 people over the next three years.

For information about the trial at the University of Maryland Medical Center and Baltimore VA Medical Center, contact the study coordinator Camille Paul at (410) 706-1724 or cpaul@medicine.umaryland.edu.

"Type 2 diabetes progresses slowly, over a long period of time, and most people eventually need two medications to control blood glucose levels," says Kristi D. Silver, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and principal investigator for the two sites. "The GRADE study will help us understand how these drug combinations impact blood sugars and the disease in general over time."

Although studies have shown the efficacy of different drugs when used in combination with metformin over short periods of time, there have been no studies to determine which combination works best and has the fewest side effects when taken over long periods of time.

"Ultimately, this information will help physicians make better choices for their patients' long-term diabetes care," says Dr. Silver, who is acting director of the University of Maryland Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The study will compare drug effects on glucose levels, adverse effects, diabetes complications and quality of life over an average of nearly five years.

To qualify for the study, patients may be on metformin, but not on any other diabetes medication. During the study, all participants will take metformin, along with a second medication randomly assigned from among four classes of medications, all approved for use with metformin by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Three classes of medications used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes increase insulin levels: sulfonylurea, which increases insulin levels directly; DPP-4 inhibitor, which indirectly increases insulin levels by increasing the effect of a naturally occurring intestinal hormone; and GLP-1 agonist, which increases the amount of insulin released in response to nutrients. There is a fourth type of medication, a long-acting insulin, which also is routinely prescribed.

Participants will be followed for up to seven years to evaluate the drugs' relative effectiveness in achieving good glycemic control and impact on other diabetes-related conditions and overall health.

GRADE (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01794143) is supported under NIH grant U01DK098246. Additional support in the form of donation of supplies comes from the National Diabetes Education Program, Sanofi-Aventis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novo Nordisk, Merck, BD Medical and Roche Diagnostics. Learn more about the study at www.grade.bsc.gwu.edu.


Categories: Clinical Trial, Diabetes Drugs, DPP-4 Inhibitor, GLP-1 Agonist, Metformin, sulfonylurea, Type 2, University of Maryland



You May Also Be Interested In...


Comments


Add your comments about this article below. You can add comments as a registered user or anonymously. If you choose to post anonymously your comments will be sent to our moderator for approval before they appear on this page. If you choose to post as a registered user your comments will appear instantly.

When voicing your views via the comment feature, please respect the Diabetes Health community by refraining from comments that could be considered offensive to other people. Diabetes Health reserves the right to remove comments when necessary to maintain the cordial voice of the diabetes community.

For your privacy and protection, we ask that you do not include personal details such as address or telephone number in any comments posted.

Don't have your Diabetes Health Username? Register now and add your comments to all our content.

Have Your Say...


Username: Password:
Comment:
©1991-2014 Diabetes Health | Home | Privacy | Press | Advertising | Help | Contact Us | Donate | Sitemap

Diabetes Health Medical Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website.