AskNadia: GLP-1 Medications That Help You Maintain Better Blood Sugar Levels

I am a 56-year-old with Type 2 and have my diabetes under control. I am seaman working on a ship. I use Humulin 70/30 thirty unit in the morning and thirty units in the evening. I heard there were new insulins that are injected once a day or once a week. Naeem A   Dear Naeem: The injections you are referring to is not insulin

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AskNadia: Why Your Diabetes Will Not Be Cured or Reversed

Dear Nadia,   I have had Type 2 diabetes for five years. My doctor says if I lose 22 pounds, my diabetes may disappear. What do you think? Roland   Dear Roland: Once you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it will not disappear if you lose weight. Some marketing people use the term reverse and cure diabetes while advocating juicing, eating a raw food

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Type 1 Diabetes: Are You Keeping Your Questions In Check?

How intrusive do people get with their health comments or questions to you? If you have had diabetes for any stretch of time, chances are, you’ve been on the receiving end of some inappropriate questions. It’s not easy, brushing off the unwanted inquiries. How do you politely and gently tell people to back off?   I had an older gentleman at work tell me how

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Diabetes Health: Doctors Using Technology to Help People With Diabetes

An online survey from Consumer Reports showed that the top complaint among 660 surveyed doctors was the failure of patients to follow advice or treatment recommendations. Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes can be effectively managed in most patients through diet, exercise and (in some cases) medication. People with diabetes often struggle to follow the orders prescribed by their doctors. People with diabetes express that they

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Living With Type 1 Diabetes: Parenting Style Impacts Control in Children

As a dad, do you tend to be authoritative and have high expectations of your child’s self control? Do you set clear limits and command respect, without bulldozing him or her? If so, you may be helping your child with type 1 diabetes stick to his or her treatment regimen. According to a recent study at the Israel Diabetes Center  of the Schneider Children’s Medical

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Diabetes Health: Get More Out of Your Doctor Visit

When you go to the doctor, it is important that you act as a good self-advocate by properly explaining your symptoms. However, since many people do not have medical training, it can sometimes be difficult to convey properly, exactly what we are feeling. This can sometimes result in you leaving your doctor’s office feeling frustrated and misunderstood. Fortunately, by learning how to communicate better, your

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Living With Type 1 Diabetes: Dear Loved Ones, Thank You for Not Holding a Grudge

What a weekend. After 21 years with Type 1 diabetes, you’d think I’d be used to these blood sugar swings, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. I had a 330 blood sugar brought on in part by stress and PMS. I’d had a low of 37 the day before. These wildly crazy swings tend to make me feel like a newbie, but I’m

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Living With Type 1 Diabetes: A Rebellious Teenager Finds Team Type 1

I am excited to have this opportunity to write a diabetes-focused blog for Diabetes Health about living and thriving with type 1 diabetes. First of all, I am extremely passionate about racing road and mountain bicycles, running 5K runs and sprint triathlons, and doing other activities that I find to compete in for Team Type 1. But before I start blogging, I would like to

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Living With Type 1 Diabetes: My Love-Hate Relationship With Food

I love carbohydrates, and sometimes, I hate carbohydrates. I think part of my love/hate relationship with food goes back to the days just before my diagnosis of type 1 as a teenager. At 18 years old, I was suddenly eating everything in sight as the hunger from my high blood sugar, due to undiagnosed diabetes, kicked in.  I lost more and more weight and became

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Living With Type 2 Diabetes: I’m Not Drunk

Several items on the market today will alert others of our medical conditions. Choices range from electronic devices that can be worn on the belt or around the neck, to medical alert bracelets, to paper cards that are carried in a wallet or purse. I vividly remember receiving what has to be the most shocking alert device of all when I was first diagnosed with

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